Cacti are relatively easy to grow. Most will tolerate neglect; yet thrive when given good care. Although maintaining attractive houseplants during winter months can be a challenge, you can still cultivate many varieties of cacti and succulents in an indoor environment. If you are looking for succulents to place indoors, you can try these favorite and beautiful species:

    1. Euphorbia Ingens.
    2. Sansevieria trifasciata “Snake Plant.”
    3. Dracena sanderana “Lucky bamboo.”
    4. Aloe Vera, “Medicine Plant.” 

Cacti grown on windowsills facing a southern exposure tend to flourish. The next best exposure is sunlight from an east or west window because it can provide direct sun for part of the day. To provide extra sunlight and air ventilation, you can place the plants outdoors in summer.

 

A general rule of thumb is that succulents require less water than many traditional houseplants that you find at garden centers and grocery stores. When placing succulents indoors, you need to water about every two weeks or when the soil is dry. If in doubt whether the soil is dry, don’t water. The best way to determine whether a cactus needs water is to provide moisture when the top 1/2 inch of soil feels dry to the finger. The soil should be thoroughly wetted at each watering, and allowed to dry before water is added again. Some gardeners use a moisture meter to determine how dry or wet the compost is. When using a mositure meter, be sure to water when the meter indicates the plant is dry. One of the most important considerations in watering a cactus, whether indoor or outdoor is to never let the pots stand in water.

 

To ensure a thriving indoor environment for your succulents, be sure to maintain the temperature during the growth period (usually spring and summer) at 60 degrees F at night and 10 to 15 degrees warmer during the day. During the dormant period (usually fall and winter), reduce the temperature to 45 to 55 degrees F. If most of your rooms are warmer than this, then place your cacti near a window (but not touching it) where the temperature may be five to 10 degrees cooler than in the middle of the room.

Although there is no “perfect” indoor succulent, you can try any of the varieties mentioned in this article or even discover new varieties on your own!